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CALA

S M L

Canadian Association for Laboratory Accreditation Inc.

Building Laboratory Excellence

News release from International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC) on ILAC 2000

Press Release For Immediate Release: August 16, 1999

Laboratory Accreditation in the New Millenium

Washington, D.C. … The ILAC 2000 Conference will be held October 29 - November 3, 2000 at the Crystal Gateway Marriott, Arlington, Virginia (703-920-3230). The International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation (ILAC) brings together various laboratory accreditation schemes operated throughout the world to further enhance and facilitate the international acceptance of test data, and the elimination of technical barriers to trade.

Founded more than twenty years ago, ILAC was formalized as a cooperation in 1996 when 44 national bodies signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in Amsterdam. This MOU provides the basis for the futher development of the Cooperation and the eventual establishment of a multilateral recognition agreement among ILAC member bodies.

ILAC's goal is to identify competent testing organizations and assure users around the world that the test data they receive from competent laboratories accredited by ILAC accreditation bodies can be relied upon, eliminating the need for duplicate testing. "Confidence, efficiency and international acceptance are primary values of accreditation, particularly in the minds of manufacturers, regulators and other specifiers" said John Locke, Chairman of the ILAC 2000 planning committee. "They want to have confidence that the test data on which their decisions are based have been produced by a capable testing agency."

"ILAC is creating an evaluation procedure based on ISO 17025 that will likely be more thorough and complete related to all areas of laboratoy competence than is usually found in user evaluations of laboratories" stated Locke. "Moreover, the cost of the evaluations is born by the laboratories themselves rather than the users. We think this is a win-win situation for the users of labvoratory test datea."

ILAC also publishes technical publications related to all aspects of laboratory accreditation and convenes technical conferences every two years. The next such conference, ILAC 2000, expects more than 300 attendees from 50 countries. The format includes educational seminars, interactive forums, networking among members, formal reporting by ILAC's committees, and decision-making on fundamental issues relating to ILAC's future. In addition, the Confrence will host a variety of informal events at which the delegates will visit the Kennedy Center, the Torpedo Factory in Old Town Alexandria and a dinner cruise on the Potomac.

To receive more information, visit the Conference web site at www.ILAC2000.com or call Robin Gildersleeve at (703) 690-1436 or Lisa Caron at (800) 374-3818.